Serious Games Analytics: Methodologies for Performance Measurement, Assessment, and Improvement (Advances in Game-Based Learning) 2015th Edition

by Christian Sebastian Loh (Editor), Yanyan Sheng (Editor), Dirk Ifenthaler (Editor)

This volume brings together research on how gameplay data in serious games may be turned into valuable analytics or actionable intelligence for performance measurement, assessment, and improvement. Chapter authors use empirical research methodologies, including existing, experimental, and emerging conceptual frameworks, from various fields, such as: computer science software engineering educational data mining statistics information visualization. Serious games is an emerging field where the games are created using sound learning theories and instructional design principles to maximize learning and training success. But how would stakeholders know what play-learners have done in the game environment, and if the actions performance brings about learning? Could they be playing the game for fun, really learning with evidence of performance improvement, or simply gaming the system, i.e., finding loopholes to fake that they are making progress? This volume endeavors to answer these questions.

Available from Amazon : Click here


Serious Games And Blended Learning; Effects On Performance And Motivation In Medical Education

By Mary Dankbaar

More efficient, flexible training models are needed in medical education. Information technology offers the tools to design and develop effective and more efficient training. The aims of this thesis were: 1) Compare the effectiveness of blended versus classroom training for the acquisition of knowledge; 2) Investigate the effectiveness and critical design features of serious games for performance improvement and motivation. Methods: Five empirical studies were conducted to answer the research questions and a descriptive study on an evaluation framework to assess serious games was performed. Results: The results of the research studies indicated that: 1) For knowledge acquisition, blended learning is equally effective and attractive for learners as classroom learning; 2) A serious game with realistic, interactive cases improved complex cognitive skills for residents, with limited self-study time. Although the same game was motivating for inexperienced medical students and stimulated them to study longer, it did not improve their cognitive skills, compared with what they learned from an instructional emodule. This indicates an 'expertise reversal effect', where a rich learning environment is effective for experts, but may be contra-productive for novices (interaction of prior knowledge and complexity of format). Discussion: A blended design is equally effective and attractive as classroom training. Blended learning facilitates adaptation to the learners' knowledge level, flexibility in time and scalability of learning. Games may support skills learning, provided task complexity matches the learner's competency level. More design-based research is needed on the effects of task complexity and other design features on performance improvement, for both novices and experts.

Available from ResearchGate : Click here


Game Thinking: Innovate smarter & drive deep engagement with design techniques from hit games

By Amy Jo Kim

Successful innovations may end up reaching a mainstream audience—but they never start off that way. That’s the paradox of innovation, most entrepreneurs fail to embrace: the typical people in your market are not the same ones you need to woo when bringing your idea to life.

Instead find the “superfans” hidden in your audience: Those willing to take risk and put up with a messy or incomplete solution in order to start solving the problem your product will eliminate in the future. Show your idea to these people. See what they make of it. What do they love about it? Where does it seem to go in the wrong direction? Allowing these early fans to “play” with your idea gives you fast and accurate answers to your most pressing questions long before your product is designed and built.

That’s where Game Thinking comes in. In this groundbreaking book, Amy Jo Kim lays out a step-by-step system for accelerating innovation, and crafting products that people love...and keep loving. The secret? Develop “impossible to put down” products by using techniques that the fast-moving games industry employs when making games that glue millions of players to their screens.

During her time working on genre-defining games like The Sims, Rock Band, and Ultima Online, Amy Jo learned that customers stick with products that help them get better at something they care about, like playing an instrument or leading a team. Amy Jo then used her insights from the game world to help hundreds of companies like Netflix, Disney, The New York Times, Ubisoft and Happify innovate faster and smarter.

Building on the principles of lean/agile design and design thinking, Game Thinking covers four powerful strategies you can use to create your next hit product: Build a product that fits how people actually behave, using insights from your high-need Superfans Keep customers engaged and moving forward with a coherent and compelling customer journey Rapidly improve your product concept by testing and tuning the core experience Expand the core experience into a full product by following the Game Thinking roadmap Get your hands on Game Thinking, and start innovating faster and smarter today.

Available from Amazon : Click here


Stealth Assessment : Measuring and Supporting Learning in Video Games

By Valerie Shute and Matthew Ventura

An approach to performance-based assessments that embeds assessments in digital games in order to measure how students are progressing toward targeted goals.

To succeed in today's interconnected and complex world, workers need to be able to think systemically, creatively, and critically. Equipping K-16 students with these twenty-first-century competencies requires new thinking not only about what should be taught in school but also about how to develop valid assessments to measure and support these competencies. In Stealth Assessment, Valerie Shute and Matthew Ventura investigate an approach that embeds performance-based assessments in digital games. They argue that using well-designed games as vehicles to assess and support learning will help combat students' growing disengagement from school, provide dynamic and ongoing measures of learning processes and outcomes, and offer students opportunities to apply such complex competencies as creativity, problem solving, persistence, and collaboration. Embedding assessments within games provides a way to monitor players' progress toward targeted competencies and to use that information to support learning.

Shute and Ventura discuss problems with such traditional assessment methods as multiple-choice questions, review evidence relating to digital games and learning, and illustrate the stealth-assessment approach with a set of assessments they are developing and embedding in the digital game Newton's Playground. These stealth assessments are intended to measure levels of creativity, persistence, and conceptual understanding of Newtonian physics during game play. Finally, they consider future research directions related to stealth assessment in education.

Available from Mitpress : Click here